Feverfew


Smooth Radio – London

Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium ) is a traditional medicinal herb which is found in many old gardens, and is also occasionally grown for ornament. The plant grows into a small bush up to around 46 cm (18 in) high, with citrus-scented leaves and is covered by flowers reminiscent of daisies. It spreads rapidly, and they will cover a wide area after a few years. It is also commonly seen in the literature by its synonyms, Chrysanthemum parthenium (L.) Bernh. and Pyrethrum parthenium (L.) Sm.
Feverfew was native to Eurasia; specifically the Balkan Peninsula, Anatolia and the Caucasus, but cultivation has spread it around the world and it is now also found in Europe, the Mediterranean, North America and Chile.[1]
The word "feverfew" derives from the Latin febrifugia, meaning "fever reducer."[2] It has been used for reducing fever, for treating headaches, arthritis and digestive problems.[3] It is hypothesized that by inhibiting the release of serotonin and prostaglandins, both of which are believed to aid the onset of migraines, feverfew limits the inflammation of blood vessels in the head.[4] This would, in theory, stop the blood vessel spasm which is believed to contribute to headaches. Feverfew may also have GABAergic effects. The active ingredients in feverfew include parthenolide and tanetin. Capsules or tablets of feverfew generally contain at least 205 mcg. parthenolide; however, it might take four to six weeks before they become effective, and feverfew is not a remedy for acute migraine attacks. Parthenolide has also been found in 2005 to induce cell death in leukemia cancer stem cells.[5] Feverfew has been used by Aveeno skincare brand to calm red and irritated skin.
Feverfew contains a relatively large amount of melatonin.[6]
Evidence that it prevents migraine is limited.[7]

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feverfew

These are bunch of feverfew I saved from the bin my daughter cut whilst trying to trim the hedge with secateurs (sp?) .Although they grow everywhere ,almost like weeds but I don’t move them once they are flowering .


This shot was taken with my Nikon Coolpix P5100 …still attached to my P&S.

Posted by pickled_newt on 2010-07-01 20:38:03

Tagged: , Feverfew , Tanacetum parthenuim , England , UK , flower , plant medicinal , plantold gardens